Some Ways to Waste Money

Just recently I have started getting e-mails from people offering to review my book(s). Of course, they want to be paid and I would never pay for a review – even from a prestigious organisation like Kirkus. For one thing, Amazon will punish you if they find out. Nor would I ask for payment in return for a review. But paying for reviews is only one way self-publishers and independently published authors can waste loads-a-money. Here, courtesy of Anne R Allen and Nate Hoffelder are some more: How to Waste Money When Self-Publishing a Book Continue reading Some Ways to Waste Money

Writers and Readers don’t always Understand Each Other

This post from Rebecca Bryn resonated with me because I recently received a couple of critical reviews of Strongbow’s Wife. In one case the writer of the review kindly e-mailed me pointing out a couple of minor period details that I got wrong. The other claimed to have had his faith in the book destroyed by the appearance of a minor  character who aspired to write ‘poetry in the Greek fashion’. Impossible in Medieval Britain according to my critic. Trouble is he was a real person who did indeed write epic poetry emulating Homer. Rebecca is definitely one of my … Continue reading Writers and Readers don’t always Understand Each Other

I HAD A DREAM

Originally posted on lucinda E Clarke:
I had a dream last night, not as earth shattering as Martin Luther King, I’m not that famous and important, and frankly although I was standing on a stage too, no one was listening to me. Sad isn’t it? Now most of us might dream of receiving the Nobel Prize for Literature and then being interviewed on a national Breakfast Show, simpering as the interviewer gushed about our brilliant book – right? Well, my dream wasn’t like that. The stage morphed into a television studio and my interview went something like this: INT: So,… Continue reading I HAD A DREAM

Writing About Adoption

An Affair With my Mother by Caitriona Palmer (Memoir) A Second Life by Dermot Bolger (Fiction) I wanted to read these books when the opportunity came, in order to see if my treatment of the subject in Honest Hearts and Transgression was authentic. Both books deal with adoption as experienced in Ireland in the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s. This was a period during which any young Irish woman who conceived out of wedlock was regarded as a pariah. Her child was taken from her and provided with a good, usually middle class, home. The mother would be ostracised by her … Continue reading Writing About Adoption