The Marriage of Strongbow and Aoife: A Union Bathed in Blood.

De Clare took my hand as he spoke and led me to an empty hut that, I supposed, had been especially prepared for us. He stepped forward and took both hands in his, lowering his head to kiss each in turn. Continue reading The Marriage of Strongbow and Aoife: A Union Bathed in Blood.

His Stag Do was a Massacre: 24th August 1170 the Sacking of Waterford.

“We can ill afford to have such men as enemies,” he said in a final effort at persuasion.
I could see the logic of Father’s assertion but it only added to the burden of responsibility that now lay upon my shoulders.” Continue reading His Stag Do was a Massacre: 24th August 1170 the Sacking of Waterford.

Gerald of Wales

Originally posted on Historical Ragbag:
Gerald of Wales also known as Giraldus Cambrensis was born in c. 1145 in Manorbier Castle which you can see in the photos below. Below you can see the room that the castle has set up to commemorate Gerald. Gerald described Maorbier as “in all broad lands of Wales Manorbier is the most pleasant place by far”[1] Gerald was of both Norman and Welsh stock. His father was William de Barri, a Norman knight, and his mother was Angharad the daughter of Nest, one of the most fascinating Welshwomen of the period who you can… Continue reading Gerald of Wales

Maud de Braose, the King’s Enemy

Originally posted on History… the interesting bits!:
Arms of William de Braose Matilda de Braose was probably born in the early 1150s in Saint-Valery-en-Caux, France, to Bernard IV, Seigneur de Saint-Valery and his wife, Matilda. Contemporary records describe her as tall and beautiful, wise and vigorous. Made famous by the de Braose’s spectacular falling-out with King John – and the manner of her death – very little is known of Matilda’s early years; though she probably spent time at her family’s manor of Hinton Waldrist in Berkshire. Sometime around 1166 she married William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber, a… Continue reading Maud de Braose, the King’s Enemy

Pembroke Castle

Originally posted on Historical Ragbag:
Pembroke Castle in South West Wales is one of the most impressive castles on Welsh soil. I hesitate to say Welsh castle, because it wasn’t built by the Welsh. The building of Pembroke Castle was begun by Arnulph de Montgomery in c. 1093 as a key part of the Norman subjugation of this portion of Wales. This first castle was nothing like the imposing fortress we see today jutting out into the Cleddau Estuary. Gerald of Wales, albeit writing much later, described it as “a slender fortress of stakes and turf.” But it was in… Continue reading Pembroke Castle