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Sailing to Deliver an Important Message

Hard on the heels of last week’s story about the poo-powered street lamp comes one about a ship made from discarded plastics. All the stuff that’s already out there needs to be put to good use, but the real message is that you and I need to reduce or eliminate our use of single trip plastics.

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We Need More of These!

A terrific idea, contributing to the solution of two (or three) problems: dog poo pollution, global warming and lighting up a beauty spot!

Now all we need is a way of capturing cow’s burps. Maybe Brian Harper can address that one – their are plenty of cows in Hereford and Worcester for him to experiment on (not that I’m advocating experimenting on animals in the usual sense, you understand.)

For Goodness Sake Stop Digging! #WATWB

I grew up in an environment where it was taken for granted that you dug the garden every spring using a spade, then, a few days later, you would go over it again with a fork to remove the weeds. During that first digging you would create trenches into which you would pile organic matter. Living in a farming region there was always plenty of farmyard manure available for this purpose. The point being that the organic matter was buried, to be accessed by the roots of the plants you subsequently grew on the plot.

If there was an area on which nothing was grown during winter you might do that first dig in autumn, leaving the turned soil exposed to frost in order to help break it down. Because we had a heavy clay soil, all of this work was deemed essential. That remains the basic principle with which I still garden.

It turns out that my parents were wrong, and so am I. You don’t have to dig at all; instead you place your organic matter on the top of the soil and plant into it.

At 77 digging is noticeably hard work these days so I’m going to embrace change, leave my spade in the shed, and have a go at “no-dig” gardening. My parents would probably turn in their graves at the thought!

The same principle can be used to ensure a sustainable source of nourishing vegetables to replace the vast numbers that are imported over huge distances.

#WATWB cohosts for this month are: Inderpreet Uppal, Sylvia Stein, Shilpa Garg, Simon Falk, Damyanti Biswas

Do you have a story about people doing good in the world? Why not share it? Here’s what you should do:

1. Keep your post to Below 500 words, as much as possible.

2. Link to a human news story on your blog, one that shows love, humanity, and brotherhood. Paste in an excerpt and tell us why it touched you. The Link is important, because it actually makes us look through news to find the positive ones to post.

3. No story is too big or small, as long as it Goes Beyond religion and politics, into the core of humanity.

4. Place the WE ARE THE WORLD badge or banner on your Post and your Sidebar.

5.Help us spread the word on social media.
Feel free to tweet, share using the #WATWB hashtag to help us trend!

Finally, click here to enter your link.

Growing Health and Well Being #WATWB

watwic-bright-tuqblkI first came across the Sydenham Garden through a feature on the BBC’s weekly gardening programme Gardener’s World. My link will take you to the page on their website that explains how they began. From there you can navigate to the rest of the site where you will see news of some of their achievements.

 

sow-grow

Whilst researching Sydenham Gardens I also came across another website that presents evidence about the efficacy of gardening as therapy, in the treatment of mental health and developing self esteem. Again, you can navigate from that page to see a huge range of information about the health and other benefits of sustainable farming and food production.

Your cohosts for this month are: Eric Lahti, Inderpreet Uppal, Shilpa Garg, Mary Giese and Roshan Radhakrishna.

Here is a reminder of the guidelines for #WATWB:

1. Keep your post to Below 500 words, as much as possible.

2. Link to a human news story on your blog, one that shows love, humanity, and brotherhood. Paste in an excerpt and tell us why it touched you. The Link is important, because it actually makes us look through news to find the positive ones to post.

3. No story is too big or small, as long as it Goes Beyond religion and politics, into the core of humanity.

4. Place the WE ARE THE WORLD badge or banner on your Post and your Sidebar. Some of you have already done so, this is just a gentle reminder for the others.

5. Help us spread the word on social media. Feel free to tweet, share using the #WATWB hashtag to help us trend!

6. Click here to add your link.

A Burning Question

Here’s Suffolk based writer Stevie Turner with some wise words on food hygiene, mostly learned from her Mum who sounds like a woman I would have liked to have known.

But who knows the answer to the question she poses? Why do they? I never do – seems pointless to me, eat outside in the garden by all means, but cook it inside.

And as for those gas fired monsters, I can’t see the point when you’ve a perfectly serviceable oven and hob inside. And then there are those outdoor heaters which seem to have been created to prevent smokers from freezing to death now they have to go outside with their coffin nails. I would never have one in my garden. If I get cold I go indoors!

via Anyone Want a Burger?

Dudes With Little Dicks

1 sdiSfUh0sAkPCkcqvQ6OYQ@2xThe story I’m linking to today is a long one, but it bears reading and sharing far and wide. It presents a stark vision of our future that has little to do with climate change or air pollution or the litter that disfigures our countryside. It’s about what happens to all the stuff we throw away.

And, if you think recycling or beachcombing for washed up plastic artifacts is the answer, think again.

Way back in the early 1960s I submitted a short story to the tutor of a writing correspondence course that I never finished. The young man at the centre of the story believed he had a great future in plastics because plastics was the future. That prediction of mine has certainly come true: in the 50 years since, our plastic production has increased 600 fold, from less than 50 million tonnes annually to over 300 million.

And the frightening thing about plastic is that, unlike timber or natural fibres, it does not rot and become a biologically useful substance. It disintegrates into particles of ever decreasing size which are ingested by fish and animals, thereby entering our own food chain.

There is, it seems, nothing we can do about it. Our best hope is to stop producing it. Banning plastic bags is not the answer, recycling plastic bottles is not the answer. If we cannot learn to live without it we are doomed. If you don’t believe me, read the article. As I say, it is long; but it is beautifully written, wide ranging and contains many lessons about the horrors that homo sapiens is, at this stage of his development, inflicting upon his home planet.

 

My Friend the Page 3 Girl!

I’ve known Theresa since she joined the Laois Writers’ Group several years ago. She later moved to County Clare but we have stayed in touch and I had the pleasure of visiting her in her home a few months ago whilst on a short break in Clare. I also interviewed her here a coupe of years ago.

via My Epilepsy & Me