The Proper Response to Famine

How should we respond to disasters? Natural events – earthquakes, floods, forest fires – usually evoke an outpouring of sympathy accompanied by the dispatch of all manner of aid. Engineers, medics, machinery and food are flown in to the disaster area to ensure that victims receive succour. Appeals raise millions of dollars to support such efforts. Is our response to famine different? Should it be? Are we more inclined to seek the cause of the catastrophe before making a commitment to assist? How deeply ingrained in our knowledge of Judao/Christian history is the story of how Joseph taught his Egyptian … Continue reading The Proper Response to Famine

5 #atoztreasures: #atozchallenge

One of the great pleasures of participating in the #atozchallenge has been the opportunity to look at what others have done with it. Over 1300 people completed the challenge so it would be impossible for any one individual to read them all. I have looked at a few – and intend to look at a few more over the next while. I’ll provide links to some I’ve liked and that you might like too. Here, in no particular order, are the first five. The submissions from The Dublinhousewife.com take the form of conversations between husband and wife or wife and … Continue reading 5 #atoztreasures: #atozchallenge

Reed, Andrew:#atozchallenge

Andrew Reed was a Congregationalist minister with a doctorate from Yale who encouraged philanthropy on a grand scale. Many of the schools and hospitals he founded live on to the present day. Perhaps Rev. Dr. Andrew Reed’s most extraordinary talent was for social networking. For it was surely his ability to extract donations from the rich and famous of Victorian England that enabled him to found so many institutions, including: Churches Orphanages Schools Asylums Hospitals D.D from Yale Born in St Clement Danes in Middlesex, England on November 27th 1787, he studied theology at Hackney Academy and was ordained a … Continue reading Reed, Andrew:#atozchallenge

History: atozchallenge

When I was fourteen I was faced with a choice. I had to decide which 8 subjects I was going to study over the next two years leading to the GCE ‘O’ level examination. For those who are not familiar with the school leaving examinations in Britain in the 1950s, the initials stand for General Certificate of Education, Ordinary level. This exam was taken by a relatively small proportion of 16 year-olds. An even smaller proportion continued for a further two years and took ‘A’ (for advanced) level GCEs in 2 or 3 subjects leading either to university or a … Continue reading History: atozchallenge

Education: #atozchallenge

Every summer whilst I was a County Councillor I was part of a group that would meet several times to allocate discretionary education grants. To explain, students enrolled on approved third level courses in registered institutions would automatically receive a government grant to support them whilst they studied. Local authorities were empowered to set aside a portion of their education budget in order to support students who did not meet the government’s criteria. A committee consisting of Councillors, advised by education officials, would assess each of the many applications received for funding under this heading. Among the claimants would be … Continue reading Education: #atozchallenge

D for Dyslexia: #atozchallenge

And also for Dunce First identified in the late 19th century, it took a long time for policy makers to accept the existence of the condition we now recognise as Dyslexia. I recall 30 years ago, when I was a member of a local education authority in England, that the education establishment still regarded it as an excuse for laziness or lack of intelligence. Members were lobbied by parent groups who believed their children exhibited the symptoms of the condition and wanted our service to recognise it, and to make available appropriate supports in our schools and colleges. I joined … Continue reading D for Dyslexia: #atozchallenge