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Tag Archives: Fiction

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What a difference a year makes…

Juliet Nubel was born in Glasgow but now live in France. She began revealing her writing to the public just a year ago, as she explains below. She is one of the 20 authors who  have contributed to the anthology “The Box Under The Bed”. Her story is heart-breakingly tragic rather than “scary” in the usually accepted sense. It occupies just two pages at the end of which you find yourself asking “what would I have done in that situation?” A situation, by the way, faced by many people every day.

Source: What a difference a year makes…

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Being Published in “The Box Under The Bed”

Another of my fellow contributors to the scary anthology describes the experience. I have just revisited Adele’s story to remind me of its brilliance. It is a remarkable achievement to combine the slowly building tension of a classic horror story with a powerful statement about attitudes to mental illness. But it is just one of 27 tales from 20 different authors in this book. A cornucopia of stories to set your skin creeping and your blood curdling. Perfect for Halloween or any dark night.

Source: Being Published in “The Box Under The Bed”

How Scary is Richard III???

Fellow ‘Box Under The Bed’ author Joanne Larner blogged about her experience working on the anthology of scary stories. It was, and continues to be, an exhilarating experience for all of us.

Source: How Scary is Richard III???

What A Fun Opportunity!

Here’s how one of my fellow authors in the anthology The Box Under The Bed was excited by the prospect. Hers is the first story in the book. Called ‘Passion’ it describes the experience of a young medical student on holiday in Cancun and the ‘fun’ she has with two ‘up for it’ holiday makers. It will make your skin crawl.

Source: What A Fun Opportunity!

Our Review of The Box Under The Bed by Dan Alatorre @savvystories #Horror

All the pre-ordered Kindle editions of the anthology are now with readers. And here, already, is another review! “each [of the stories] is a darned good read” What are you waiting for?

 

Source: Our Review of The Box Under The Bed by Dan Alatorre @savvystories #Horror

Check this out. Holy Crap!

Did I happen to mention that I’ve the honour of being included in an anthology due out on Kindle 1st October and available now in paperback? Well it seems someone with a long pedigree in horror/paranormal/sci-fi wants a review copy. I’m not getting too excited until I see what she has to say about it.

 

Source: Check this out. Holy Crap!

If Writing is not Political, What’s the Point?

A recent blog post from Allison Maruska highlighted the dilemma that some writers face when exposing themselves via their blogs and social media. If potential readers get wind of my political beliefs will they decline to purchase my books?

Do the people I hope will buy my books need to know my thoughts on Donald Trump or just how many cups of coffee I drink whilst working on the next novel in the series? My views on creationism or climate change, or only how my latest research trip is going?

My question to people who struggle with these dilemmas is: “why do you write?” Because the truth is that all writing, if it is to mean anything, is of necessity political.

Is anyone in any doubt about Dickens’s politics? Or Orwell’s? Did Wells’s well known Socialism put people off his writing?

Of all genres, Science Fiction is, perhaps, the most obviously political. It’s basic plot involves an individual or group struggling against a regime with which they disagree. However the author chooses to present the two sides, which one is portrayed as the embodiment of evil and which as all that is good and just, he or she is making a political statement.

Neither the writer nor the reader can relate to the situation in an imagined world except by comparison with parallels in our own world. And it is how the author handles those parallels, how, for example, he portrays fear of “the other” as natural or irrational, that reveals his or her political stance on problems in the real world.

Which features of an invented religion are based on the beliefs of certain religions in our world? Are they shown to offer clear benefits to those who practice them, or are they revealed to be the cause of unnecessary suffering?

Even in romantic novels, which might be deemed by some as trivial, the protagonists have conversations and disagreements. The nature of those disagreements reveal, whether intentionally or not, the author’s world view.

When it comes to blogging, if your aim as an author is to show your readers the kind of person who wrote the book or books that you are publicising; if, in doing so, you hold back some essential part of yourself, are you not being dishonest? And if the reader discovers, through reading your book, a set of beliefs he despises is he not just as likely to reject you and your writing as if he made the discovery through your blog?

You might think you are protecting your “bottom line”, and, by extension, the welfare of those who depend on your income for their own security. The truth is, I contend, that you are not being true either to yourself or to your hoped for readers. If you are afraid, as Frank Sinatra put it, in Paul Anka’s words, to “state [your] case of which [you are] certain”, perhaps you are not meant to be a writer.