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Tag Archives: Irish History

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Another Connection Between Ireland and the Marcher Lords

Another entry in the Historical Ragbag’s Advent Calendar of Medieval Ruins involving Strongbow and his cohorts. I remember spending a few delightful days in Dunbrody, at a country house hotel run by one of Ireland’s ‘celebrity’ chefs. There’s a small brewery there, too, and I occasionally drink a glass of the excellent pale ale produced there.

Not that any of that has anything to do with medieval history or Strongbow! Enjoy the article. The more I read about Irish history the more I understand the fraught relationship between the neighbouring islands. I do think it’s important, for English people especially, to gain a better understanding of that relationship and how it has evolved.

via Advent Calendar of Medieval Religious Institutions: December 14th: Dunbrody Abbey

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The Legacy of Strongbow’s Son-in-Law

Today’s entry in the Historical Ragbag’s Advent calendar is another from County Wexford. The storm referred to in the article also led to the construction of a light house on Hook Head. Legend has it that a monk maintained bonfires there to warn mariners of the hazardous rocks below. Marshal funded the construction of a lighthouse, a round tower with 2 metre thick walls that contain a spiral staircase leading to the light source at the top. If you are ever in Ireland it is well worth a visit.

via Advent Calendar of Medieval Religious Institutions: December 11th: Tintern Parva

The Birth Place of Strongbow’s Wife

This series of Advent posts about medieval buildings is proving very interesting with lots of places worth visiting, some of which I have visited myself at various times. Today’s features the Abbey founded by Strongbow’s father-in-law.

The tab ‘Hereford and Ireland History’ on the menu above will take you to lots of background material to the story, and under ‘Publications’ you will find a link to my book ‘Strongbow’s Wife’ which tells what happened in the years following his arrival.

via Advent Calendar of medieval Religious institutions: December 10th: St Mary’s Abbey Ferns.

Rhode Island Remembers the Irish Famine

https://videopress.com/embed/RgxNbiN3?hd=0&autoPlay=0&permalink=0&loop=0

A larger-than-life statue of three Irish figures sits on a round stone base, bordered by a walkway that incorporates the donor-bricks and flagstones. The walkway leads to a commemorative wall that narrates the history of the Great Hunger amid Irish immigration. The sidewalk beneath the wall incorporates an outline map depicting the coasts of America […]

via The Great Hunger Memorial, Providence, Rhode Island — Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

From Page to Print

A_Purgatory_of_Miser_Cover_for_Kindle

Take a look at the menu above and, if you have been here before, you will notice something missing. A Purgatory of Misery has gone. That is because it is now a print and digital book. The digital version is available to pre-order right now. Print and digital will be released on 20th November. Click the link above to go to Amazon.

 

Here are a few of the things you will discover by reading the book:

  • How a request for help from an Irish King led to 800 years of enmity and distrust between Ireland and her larger neighbour
  • How subsequent contests for land and power on the British mainland spilled over into Ireland with terrible consequences for that nation’s inhabitants
  • How religious fanaticism, following the Reformation, resulted in the massacre of Irish people and the banning of religious observance
  • How Irish Catholics were forbidden to practice certain professions or serve in the British army
  • How Irish men enlisted instead for the armies of Britain’s enemies
  • Why William of Orange’s success at the Battle of the Boyne was not the victory for Protestantism that some would have you believe
  • How the peculiar geography of Ireland made it especially suitable for the cultivation of the humble spud
  • How patterns of land ownership and control left Irish people particularly vulnerable to economic crises
  • How attitudes to poverty, and the chosen means of alleviating it, proved utterly inadequate to deal with a crisis of monumental proportions
  • How British arrogance and self belief contributed to the idea that Irish peasants were inferior
  • How annual food shortages, caused by the exhaustion of one year’s crop before the next year’s harvest, may have caused an observed lack of intelligence among the peasant class
  • How politicians’ ideologies prevented them from introducing the most appropriate measures to deal with the crisis
  • How journalists and independent ‘investigators’ witnessed the horrors and reported them but were unable to offer solutions
  • How the citizens of British, American and Canadian cities responded to a nineteenth century refugee crisis
  • How Irish orphan girls were transported to Australia to serve the needs of pioneering bachelor farmers
  • How an attempted revolution, emulating those taking place elsewhere in Europe, descended into farce
  • The origin of the Irish tricoleur

All of that, and more, in a book being sold at the lowest price permitted on Amazon (0.99 in most currencies for the digital version although the price you see may be different because of local sales taxes).

“Writers not helping each other? Rubbish.”

This is why I’m excited about being part of this ‘scary story’ project.

My story is based on real events that took place in the North Atlantic in December 1835, involving an Irish ship en-route from Nova Scotia to Limerick.

Source: “Writers not helping each other? Rubbish.”

The Poor Law Inspector – Update.

I can’t believe it is 6 months since I first posted about this project of mine. If anyone is interested, here is an update on my progress since then.

First of all I need to explain that this is part of a long term project which includes a non-fiction book about the Great Irish Famine, as well as the historical novel based on the activities of Capt. Arthur Kennedy and Colonel Crofton Vandeleur in Kilrush between November 1847 and 1851.

I have been working hard on the non-fiction work over the summer and have what I consider to be a decent draft ready for sharing. I am looking for beta readers but, meanwhile, I intend to publish it here in installments over the coming days. It will appear as pages rather than posts and those pages will be collected under a new menu item ‘Purgatory’ – see it in the menu bar above. I will post about each new page as it is created. A few elements of it have already appeared here as posts.

Why ‘Purgatory’?

Charles Wood, 1st Viscount Halifax. Chancellor of the Exchequer during the Great Irish Famine. Image from wikipedia

Well, I have chosen the working title of ‘A Purgatory of Misery: How Victorian Liberalism Exacerbated a National Disaster’. The words come from the following quotation: “except through a purgatory of misery and starvation, I cannot see how Ireland is to emerge into anything approaching either quiet or prosperity.” said by Charles Wood, Chancellor of the Exchequer in Lord John Russell’s Whig government, approving the harsher measures contained in the Poor Law Extension Act of June 1847.

Today’s installment consists of the preface and introduction and you can read it here.

I have now recommenced work on The Poor Law Inspector and signed up to produce 10,000 words during October on Tim Pike’s ‘Chapter Buzz’ site. Why not follow my progress over there and join in by commenting?