Aftermath of abuse: Transgression extract #2

Yesterday I posted an extract in which two people discuss the possibility that a third might be a paedophile. In this second extract the accuser recalls an incident involving a radio DJ when she was 14. “He was staying in a small guest house just off the promenade. He invited us in. Got us dancing. I didn’t like the way he started groping us. We were lucky. He didn’t try to stop us when we ran out.” She resumed that business with the front of her jeans. Smoothing, scratching, smoothing. He guessed there must be something else. A memory too … Continue reading Aftermath of abuse: Transgression extract #2

Turning a Blind Eye: Another Novel Extract

The idea for writing Transgression came about as a result of the original revelations about Jimmy Savile and Stuart Hall.  A writer’s friend is accused of being a paedophile. In this brief extract, the writer discusses the prospect with his partner. “You’re very quiet,” Connie said. “I was just thinking about what Sally said. You know, that if her father was much older than Madge he was probably a paedo who couldn’t stop himself, that there are probably other victims out there.” “Like all those women who came forward after Jimmy Savile was outed?” “I suppose, yes. And then all … Continue reading Turning a Blind Eye: Another Novel Extract

Car Crashes and Shoot-outs

You won’t find them in my novel Transgression. Which probably explains why one reviewer said it was boring and went on to claim that there was “not a lot going on.” There are two deaths from natural causes, a couple of suicides, a rape, the sexual abuse of a minor by a radio DJ, people-trafficking for underage sex and a middle aged married couple who make love in a Welsh woodland whilst on holiday. All pretty ordinary run of the mill stuff – certainly no exhilarating car chases or terrifying shoot-outs. I know it shouldn’t, but that comment, my first … Continue reading Car Crashes and Shoot-outs

Adoption: a Recurring Theme

I began writing my first novel in the summer of 2010. I had been living in Ireland for a little under 4 years and had been reading about the history of migration of Irish people, whether the consequence of famine, punishment by ‘transportation’ to the antipodes, or simply the search for a better life. One of several books that I read dealing with the subject was a slim volume telling the true story of a young man who, at the age of 19 in 1895, traveled from his family home in the Irish Midlands to North America. After a spell … Continue reading Adoption: a Recurring Theme

Not Asking for It

In my previous post I talked a lot about Roger, the principle protagonist in my latest novel, Transgression. It is time now to tell you a little about some of the other characters in the book. Douglas is a voyeur. A characteristic I am ashamed to say he shares with me. Unlike me, he has the arrogance to believe that he is entitled to go beyond ogling and make unwelcome advances towards any woman to whom he is attracted. He has no compunction about using his power as a Member of the British Parliament to take advantage of the many … Continue reading Not Asking for It

The Language of Sex

Sinead O’Connor used the ‘C’ word in a tweet. It seems she took offence at the presence of a certain young woman, famous for being famous, on the cover of Rolling Stone. She could have said “What’s that face doing on the cover of Rolling Stone?”. Except it wouldn”t have had the same impact as the woman’s body part she chose to use instead of ‘face’. How is it that words associated with sex and the sexual organs have been subsumed into the language of hate, used to express one’s response to an event or behaviour that we regard as … Continue reading The Language of Sex

Sex in the 1950s

  I think I was in my late twenties when I first became aware of the possibility of oral sex. Does that make me unusual? On the contrary, I believe I am typical of my generation. The circumstance of my initiation into the world of oral-genital contact was the showing of a black and white porn film in a neighbour’s living room, sometime in 1969 or ’70. The wives were at a Tupperware party, or something of the kind. My immediate reaction was one of disgust. I could not believe that ordinary folk would behave like that. It seemed perverted, … Continue reading Sex in the 1950s